Acclaim
Weber's Clarinet Quintet Op 34, when played by an intellectually astute, and technically untouchable clarinetist like Richie Hawley, is like hearing a genius revealed at last. Read More...
Daniel Kepl, Casa Magazine
His playing of the Mozart Quintet tempted the word "perfect," for, as is customary with him, everything was in place -- tonally, rhythmically and above all, musically. Read More...
Mary Ellyn Hutton, Music in Cincinnati
The crowning achievement of the Lopez-Cobos recording was Hawley's gorgeous clarinet solo at the beginning of (movement) III...rarely have I heard it played with such a combination of expression and tonal beauty. Read More...
Hansen, American Record Guide
His ability to turn ebony into gold -- to impose his will on the instrument and make it sing -- was evident throughout, from rapid passages to the hushed return of the opening theme in the serene Adagio. Read More...
Mary Ellyn Hutton, Cincinnati Post
Francis Poulenc's Sonata for Clarinet and Piano (1962) is a work of insistent good cheer, and Richie Hawley, principal clarinet of the Cincinnati Symphony, Americanized its purpose with G.I. Joe certitude, his technique stunning the room with energy and finese. Faculty pianist, Natasha Kislenko, kept up with Mr. Hawley's propulsively amazing articulation, in equal measure.
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Daniel Kepl, Santa Barbara News-Press

"When principal clarinetist Richard Hawley stepped out to play two concertos Friday morning, it was an example of the real virtuosity that lies within the ranks of Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra"

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Janelle Gelfand, Cincinnati Enquirer

The result was stunning, surely one of the best performances in a season fortunately full of excellent renderings of Reich's music. The intricate multiple lines bent and blended, but never blurred in a kind of musical version of Piet Mondrian's "Broadway Boogie Woogie." Hawley took three curtain calls and deserved many more for this thrilling, difficult solo.

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Charles Donelan, The Santa Barbara Independant

The famous Clarinet Concerto in A Major, K 622 (Mozart)... contains many long, sublime melodies that soloist Richard Hawley was able to play with the seamless flowing tone so many clarinetists long for and few can achieve.

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John Toedtman, Cincinnati Enquirer

Jarvi stepped aside near the end and let Hawley, Marshall and the players rip, the notated "Riffs" aping true improvisation. It prompted a spontaneous ovation as well as an encore, Gershwin's witty, urbane "Walking the Dog" in which Hawley showed once again that he owns far more than classical chops.

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Mary Ellyn Hutton, Cincinnati Post
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